Madhu Bhatnagar is a SPHEEHA member and one of Sanctuary’s Green Teacher Awardees and is a living example of what teachers can do to help keep our forests and wildlife alive. Every year she organises programs for Kids, under the banner of SPHEEHA Sanctuary Cub programme. 

Her work has been highlighted by many leading organisation like Santuary Asia, Kids for Tiger amongst others.The featured image is from the ‘Leave Me Alone’ campaign, organised an event at Delhi Public School, Shastripuram, Agra, to mark Global Tiger Day, held annualy on July 29 to give worldwide attention to the reservation of tigers.

Every year hundred of students from various schools participate in the event and films like ‘The Truth About Tigers’ by Shekar Dattatri are screened and then followed with discussions explaining the intrinsic link between the tiger, forests, water, climate change and us. The students become aware and are always moved by the news on the plight of the tiger.

Madhu makes students aware that we have lost 97% of all wild tigers in a bit over 100 years. Instead of 100,000, as few as 3000 live in the wild today, last year it was 3200! A number of Tiger species have already been extinct. Tigers may be one of the most admired animals, but they are also vulnerable to extinction. She also dwells on the man-animal conflict and explains how people and animals are competing for space. The conflict threatens the world’s remaining wild tigers and poses a major problem for communities living in or near tiger forests. As forests shrink and prey gets scarce, tigers are forced to hunt domestic livestock, which many local communities depend on for their livelihood. In retaliation, tigers are killed or captured. “Conflict” tigers are known to end up for sale in black markets. Local community dependence on forests for fuelwood, food and timber also heightens the risk of tiger attacks.

Every year the students attending this program leave by taking an oath to help provide the tiger with space, protection and isolation.

The city of the Taj is far ahead of Delhi, Kanpur or Nainital in terms of the level of black carbon in the atmosphere, one of the factors responsible for giving a yellow tinge to the 17th century white marble monument. A study by Dayalbagh Technical Institute with the help of satellite data has revealed that the level of black carbon is far higher than in the national capital and Kanpur. Even the levels of suspended particulate matter and particulate matter are very high in the city as compared to permissible limits.

Moreover, the survey has found that even the radiative forcing (the difference of radiation absorbed by the earth and that sent back into space) is on the higher side as compared to Delhi or Kanpur. Assistant professor Ranjeet Kumar, principal investigator in the study, said that in Agra heat absorption is more due to pollutants.

“There are two types of components present in the environment. One reduces global warming, while the other increases it. In Agra, the latter’s composition is quite high. The presence of sulphate aerosol, which has a cooling effect, is very low in Agra. It is less than two microgram per cubic metre,” Kumar said. He added that there is no fixed permissible limit for black carbon like other pollutants, as studies are still going on, but the figures suggest that the level of pollution in the city is very high.

The study is being funded by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). For this, equipment like multi-wavelength radiometer for measuring radiation and aethalometer for measuring levels of black carbon are installed and pollutant levels were recorded between 2013 and 2015. “These are the preliminary data, as the project will continue for the next three years,” Kumar added.

Notably, a joint study to look into factors behind the discolouration of the Taj Mahal by the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kanpur, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA, Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) and University of Wisconsin at Madison, USA, last year had revealed that carbonaceous particles (black carbon and brown carbon) and dust on marble surfaces are mainly behind the discolouration of the white marble surface. Percentage-wise, 59% discoloration is due to dust, 38% from brown carbon and 3% from black carbon, the Indo-US study reported.

 

(Published in The Times of India, November 20, 2015/Contributed by SPHEEHA Associate Member – Ranjeet Kumar Sinha)

There are numerous issues that plague Agra. From reducing green cover to monkey menace to chaotic traffic to strewn garbage to sanitation and many more. Its time that the City wakes to the reality and citizens, administrations and likeminded bodies help in making this city truly world class. SPHEEHA endeavours alone will not help.

Included in this video are the top 10 Heritage & must visit sites of Agra. SPHEEHA conducts “Agra beyond Taj” every year and highlights little known monuments of Agra.

We have used this video to help people create awareness in people both in Agra and beyond so that appropriate measures can be taken before its too late. Help us by sharing this page and making people aware of this dying river.

Environment is the surrounding things. It includes living things and natural forces. The environment of living things provides conditions for development and growth as well as danger and damage. Living things do not simply exist in their environment. They constantly interact with it. Organisms change in response to conditions in their environment. The environment consists of the interactions among plants, animals, soil, water, temperature, light, and other living and non-living things.

Environmental issues are harmful effects of human activity on the biophysical environment.

SPHEEHA showcases this World History Final Project – highlighting the the issues with the changing global environment.